F8 For Mac

Posted onby admin
  1. F8 Mac Prefix
  2. F8 Mac Address
  3. F8 For Mac Pro

Control accessibility options with your keyboard and Siri

F8 Control is an app that enables remote control of the ZOOM F8/F8n. With it, you can use an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch (5th generation and later) as a wireless remote controller for an F8/F8n. In addition to the fundamental operations of starting/stopping recording/playback and searching forward/backward, this app allows the adjustment of trim. MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016), MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports) 2. To use VoiceOver and VoiceOver Utility, you might need to turn on 'Use all F1, F2, etc. Keys as standard function keys' in Keyboard preferences. By a given MAC address, retrieve OUI vendor information, detect virtual machines, possible applications, read the information encoded in the MAC, and get our research's results regarding the MAC address or the OUI.

You can use these keyboard shortcuts to control accessibility options, or ask Siri to perform these functions. For example, ask Siri to ”Turn VoiceOver On.”

ActionShortcut
Display Accessibility OptionsOption-Command-F5
or triple-press Touch ID (power button) on supported models1
Turn VoiceOver on or off2Command-F5 or Fn-Command-F5
or hold Command and triple-press Touch ID on supported models1
Open VoiceOver Utility, if VoiceOver is turned on2Control-Option-F8 or Fn-Control-Option-F8
Turn zoom on or off3Option-Command-8
Zoom in3Option–Command–Plus sign (+)
Zoom out3Option–Command–Minus sign (-)
Invert colors4Control-Option-Command-8
Reduce contrastControl-Option-Command-Comma (,)
Increase contrastControl-Option-Command-Period (.)

1. MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2016), MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)

2. To use VoiceOver and VoiceOver Utility, you might need to turn on 'Use all F1, F2, etc. keys as standard function keys' in Keyboard preferences. You might also need to make VoiceOver ignore the next key press before you can use some of the other Mac keyboard shortcuts.

3. To use the zoom shortcuts, you might need to turn on 'Use keyboard shortcuts to zoom' in Accessibility preferences.

4. To enable this shortcut, choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Keyboard. In the Shortcuts tab, select Accessibility on the left, then select ”Invert colors” on the right.

Use your keyboard like a mouse

You can use your keyboard like a mouse to navigate and interact with items onscreen. Use the Tab key and arrow keys to navigate, then press Space bar to select an item.

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Keyboard.
  2. Click Shortcuts.
  3. From the bottom of the preferences window, select ”Use keyboard navigation to move focus between controls.” In macOS Mojave or earlier, this setting appears as an ”All controls” button instead.
ActionShortcut
Switch between navigation of all controls on the screen, or only text boxes and listsControl-F7 or Fn-Control-F7
Move to the next controlTab
Move to the previous controlShift-Tab
Move to the next control when a text field is selectedControl-Tab
Move the focus to the previous grouping of controlsControl-Shift-Tab
Move to the adjacent item in a list, tab group, or menu
Move sliders and adjusters (Up Arrow to increase values, Down Arrow to decrease values)
Arrow keys
Move to a control adjacent to the text fieldControl–Arrow keys
Choose the selected menu itemSpace bar
Click the default button or perform the default actionReturn or Enter
Click the Cancel button or close a menu without choosing an itemEsc
Move the focus to the previous panelControl-Shift-F6
Move to the status menu in the menu barControl-F8 or Fn-Control-F8
Activate the next open window in the front appCommand–Grave accent (`)
Activate the previous open window in the front appShift–Command–Grave accent (`)
Move the focus to the window drawerOption–Command–Grave accent (`)

Navigate menus with your keyboard

To use these shortcuts, first press Control-F2 or Fn-Control-F2 to put the focus on the menu bar.

ActionShortcut
Move from menu to menuLeft Arrow, Right Arrow
Open a selected menuReturn
Move to menu items in the selected menuUp Arrow, Down Arrow
Jump to a menu item in the selected menuType the menu item's name
Choose the selected menu itemReturn

Use Mouse Keys to move the mouse pointer

When Mouse Keys is turned on, you can use the keyboard or numeric keypad keys to move the mouse pointer.

ActionShortcut
Move up8 or numeric keypad 8
Move downK or numeric keypad 2
Move leftU or numeric keypad 4
Move rightO or numeric keypad 6
Move diagonally down and to the leftJ or numeric keypad 1
Move diagonally down and to the rightL or numeric keypad 3
Move diagonally up and to the left7 or numeric keypad 7
Move diagonally up and to the right9 or numeric keypad 9
Press the mouse buttonI or numeric keypad 5
Hold the mouse buttonM or numeric keypad 0
Release the mouse button. (period)

Learn more

  • Change the behavior of the function keys or modifier keys

How would you communicate with a device when you don’t have the IP?

You might be in a situation where you don’t have the IP address of a device in a local network, but all you have is records of the MAC or hardware address.

Or your computer is unable to display its IP due to various reasons, and you are getting a “No Valid IP Address” error.

Finding the IP from a known MAC address should be the task of a ReverseARP application, the counterpart of ARP.

But RARP is an obsolete protocol with many disadvantages, so it was quickly replaced by other protocols like BOOTP and DHCP, which deal directly with IP addresses.

In this article, we’ll show you how to find IPs and device vendors using MAC addresses with different methods for free.

Understanding ARP

ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is the protocol in charge of finding MAC addresses with IPs in local network segments.

It operates with frames on the data link layer.

As you might already know, devices in the data link layer depend on MAC addresses for their communication.

Their frames encapsulate packets that contain IP address information.

A device must know the destination MAC address to communicate locally through media types like Ethernet or Wifi, in layer 2 of the OSI model.

Understanding how ARP works can help you find IPs and MAC addresses quickly.

The following message flow diagram can help you understand the concept:

  1. The local computer sends a ping (ICMP echo request) to a destination IP address (remote computer) within the same segment. Unfortunately, the local computer does not know the MAC address… it only knows the IP address.
  2. The destination hardware address is unknown, so the ICMP echo request is put on hold. The local computer only knows its source/destination IP and its source MAC addresses. ARP uses two types of messages, ARP Request and Reply.

The local computer sends an ARP REQUEST message to find the owner of the IP address in question.

This message is sent to all devices within the same segment or LAN through a broadcast MAC (FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF) as the destination.

  1. Because the remote computer is part of the same network segment, it receives the broadcast message sent by the local computer. All other computers in the LAN also receive the broadcast but they know that the destination IP is not theirs, so they discard the packet. Only the remote computer with destination IP, responds to the ARP REQUEST with an ARP REPLY, which contains the target MAC address.
  2. The local computer receives the ARP REPLY with the MAC address. It then resumes the ICMP echo request, and finally, the remote computer responds with an ICMP echo reply.

Finding IPs with ARP

You can use ARP to obtain an IP from a known MAC address.

But first, it is important to update your local ARP table in order to get information from all devices in the network.

Send a ping (ICMP echo reply) to the entire LAN, to get all the MAC entries on the table.

To ping the entire LAN, you can send a broadcast to your network.

Open the Command Prompt in Windows or terminal in macOS and type.

ping 192.168.0.255

My subnet is 192.168.0.0/24 (mask of 255.255.255.0), so the broadcast address is 192.168.0.255 which can be calculated or found with a “Print Route” command in Windows or a “netstat -nr” in macOS. Or can also be obtained with a subnet calculator.

For Windows:

Step 1.

  • Open the CMD (Command Prompt)
  • Go to the “Start” menu and select “Run” or press (Windows key + R) to open the Run application
  • In the “Open” textbox type “cmd” and press “Ok”.

This will open the command-line interface in Windows.

Step 2.

  • Enter the “arp” command.
  • The arp command without any additional arguments will give you a list of options that you can use.
F8 For Mac

Step 3.

  • Use the arp with additional arguments to find the IP within the same network segment.
  • With the command “arp -a” you can see the ARP table and its entries recently populated by your computer with the broadcast ping.

Step 4.

  • Reading the output.
  • The information displayed in the arp-a is basically the ARP table on your computer.
  • It shows a list with IP addresses, their corresponding physical address (or MAC), and the type of allocation (dynamic or static).

Let’s say you have the MAC address 60-30-d4-76-b8-c8 (which is a macOS device) and you want to know the IP.

From the results shown above, you can map the MAC address to the IP address in the same line.

The IP Address is 192.168.0.102 (which is in the same network segment) belongs to 60-30-d4-76-b8-c8.

You can forget about those 224.0.0.x and 239.0.0.x addresses, as they are multicast IPs.

For macOS:

Step 1:

  • Open the Terminal App. go to Applications > Utilities > Terminal or Launchpad > Other > Terminal.

Step 2:

  • Enter the “arp” command with an “-a” flag.
  • Once you enter the command “arp -a” you’ll receive a list with all ARP entries to the ARP Table in your computer.
  • The output will show a line with the IP address followed by the MAC address, the interface, and the allocation type (dynamic/static).

Finding IPs with the DHCP Server

The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is the network protocol used by TCP/IP to dynamically allocate IP addresses and other characteristics to devices in a network.

The DHCP works with a client/server mode.

The DHCP server is the device in charge of assigning IP addresses in a network, and the client is usually your computer.

For home networks or LANs, the DHCP Server is typically a router or gateway.

If you have access to the DHCP Server, you can view all relationships with IPs, MACs, interfaces, name of the device, and lease time in your LAN.

Step 1.

  • Log into the DHCP Server. In this example, the DHCP server is the home gateway.
  • If you don’t know the IP address of your DHCP Server/ Gateway, you can run an ipconfig (in Windows) or ifconfig (in macOS/Linux).
  • This particular DHCP Server/Gateway has a web interface.

Step 2.

  • Enter the IP address on the search bar of the web browser, and input the right credentials.

Step 3.

  • Find the DHCP Clients List.
  • In this TP-Link router, the DHCP Server functionality comes as an additional feature.
  • Go to DHCP > DHCP Clients List. From this list, you can see the mapping between MAC addresses and their assigned IPs.

Using Sniffers

If you couldn’t find the IP in the ARP list or unfortunately don’t have access to the DHCP Server, as a last resort, you can use a sniffer.

Packet sniffers or network analyzers like Nmap (or Zenmap which is the GUI version) are designed for network security.

They can help identify attacks and vulnerabilities in the network.

With Nmap, you can actively scan your entire network and find IPs, ports, protocols, MACs, etc.

If you are trying to find the IP from a known MAC with a sniffer like Nmap, look for the MAC address within the scan results.

How to find the Device and IP with a Sniffer?

Step 1.

  • Keep records of your network IP address information.
  • In this case, my network IP is 192.168.0.0/24. If you don’t know it, a quick “ipconfig” in Windows cmd or an “ifconfig” in macOS or Linux terminal can show you the local IP and mask.
  • If you can’t subnet, go online to a subnet calculator and find your network IP.

Step 2.

  • Download and open Nmap.
  • Download Nmap from this official link https://nmap.org/download.html and follow its straightforward installation process.

Step 3.

  • Open Nmap (or Zenmap) and use the command “sudo nmap -sn (network IP)” to scan the entire network (without port scan).
  • The command will list machines that respond to the Ping and will include their MAC address along with the vendor.
  • Don’t forget the “sudo” command.
  • Without it, you will not see MAC addresses.

Finding out the device vendor from a MAC address

Ok, so now you were able to find out the IP address using “arp -a” command or through the DHCP Server.

But what if you want to know more details about that particular device?

What vendor is it?

Your network segment or LAN might be full of different devices, from computers, firewalls, routers, mobiles, printers, TVs, etc.

And MAC addresses contain key information for knowing more details about each network device.

First, it is essential to understand the format of the MAC address.

Traditional MAC addresses are 48 bits represented in 12-digit hexadecimal numbers (or six octets).

The first half of the six octets represent the Organizational Unique Identifier (OUI) and the other half is the Network Interface Controller (NIC) which is unique for every device in the world.

There is not much we can do about the NIC, other than communicating with it.

But the OUI can give us useful information about the vendor if you didn’t use Nmap, which can also give you the hardware vendor.

Mac

A free online OUI lookup tool like Wireshark OUI Lookup can help you with this.

Just enter the MAC address on the OUI search, and the tool will look at the first three octets and correlate with its manufacturing database.

Final Words

Although the RARP (the counterpart of ARP) was specifically designed to find IPs from MAC addresses, it was quickly discontinued because it had many drawbacks.

RARP was quickly replaced by DHCP and BOOTP.

But ARP is still one of the core functions of the IP layer in the TCP/IP protocol stack.

It finds MAC addresses from known IPs, which is most common in today’s communications.

ARP works under the hood to keep a frequently used list of MACs and IPs.

F8 Mac Prefix

But you can also use it to see the current mappings with the command arp -a.

Aside from ARP, you can also use DHCP to view IP information. DHCP Servers are usually in charge of IP assignments.

F8 Mac Address

If you have access to the DHCP server, go into the DHCP Client list and identify the IP with the MAC address.

Finally, you can use a network sniffer like Nmap, scan your entire network, and find IPs, and MACs.

F8 For Mac Pro

If you only want to know the vendor, an online OUI lookup like Wireshark can help you find it quickly.